CCSS

In October 2013, the I.N.K. bloggers all posted about Common Core State Standards (CCSS to its friends!).  As you'd expect from such creative authors, there were as many approaches as people.  Here are the links:

Posts that feature CCSS Activites

Voila-Seven CCSS Activites You Can Do Now 
Rosalyn Schanzer

Common Core Connections
April Pulley Sayre

On the Value of Visual
Karen Romano Young

Pairing Fiction and Nonfiction: A Common Core Pleasure
Marfe Ferguson Delano

A Look at Common Core Standard #6 (and some friends!)
Susan E. Goodman

Common Core: Main Points & Ideas
Melissa Stewart

Common Core Standards: In the Classroom
Jan Greenberg

It's a Challenge to Meet Common Core State Standards!
Loreen Leedy

The Joy of Exploring Book Structure with the Common Core
Elizabeth Rusch

Posts that discuss educational/philosophical/business aspects of CCSS

The Fly in the Common Core Ointment
Vicki Cobb

Common Sense
Steve Jenkins 

What Publishers Are Doing
Gretchen Woelfle

Creativity and the Common Core
Anna M. Lewis

Las Vegas, Non-Fiction and the CCSS for Math
David Schwartz

Advice from an Expert (not me)
Steve Sheinkin

Common Ground, Common Core
Susan E. Goodman


Posts that feature an author's view of CCSS and writing

Common Core Through the Eyes of a Storyteller
Barbara Kerley 

The CCSS and Me--I Could Be Wrong
Jim Murphy

It's All about George Clooney
Deborah Heiligman

What Jim Murphy Said
Tanya Lee Stone

What Others Have Said Re: Geo. C. + CCSS Goes for Me 2
Cheryl Harness

Cousin Ida
Susan Kuklin

Something HAUNTING for Halloween!
Kelly Milner Halls

2 comments:

Susan Barker said...

I attempted to place a comment on the Huffington Post but found one has to have a Facebook account. That limits open discussion. Here is what I intended to post.

As a certified teacher, I support standards that increase the use of nonfiction in the classroom. I was a member of an in-service science education team from 1993 -2005. Our sessions were attended by teachers from many different school districts. One of the concerns we frequently heard from K-5 teachers, both new ones and experienced ones, was how little their teacher education program had done to prepare them for teaching science. Yes, they had learned a lot of facts and a lot of concepts.

Taking physics, chemistry and biology 101 sounds good in theory, but did little to help teachers bring science to life for their students. The nonfiction books advocated by Mrs. Cobb provide a spark that never existed in science textbooks. That's why teachers excitedly shared titles of great nonfiction books during our in-service.

Nonfiction can be a catalyst and jumping off point for learning about new topics. Nonfiction can challenge students to be scientists by designing and preforming experiments. Finally, great nonfiction serves as a springboard to additional reading, research and learning. The combination of practicing and discussing science activities, having materials and learning about nonfiction books was a great combination. Teachers often left inspired. On the evaluation sheets, they wrote "I can do this!"

Nonfiction books are a powerful tool. That is why standards encourage them. With time being a precious commodity, combining reading and science makes a lot of sense. Good teachers have always known this.
Respectfully, Dr. Susan L. Barker

Susan Barker said...

As a certified teacher, I support standards that increase the use of nonfiction in the classroom.

From 1993-2005, I was a member of an in-service science education team. One of the concerns we frequently heard from K-5 teachers, both new and experienced ones, was how little their teacher education program did to prepare them for teaching science. While they learned a lot of facts and concepts in physics, chemistry and biology 101, the courses did little to convey the curiosity and excitement essential to good science. This is exactly why good nonfiction books, as advocated by Mrs. Cobb, are so important.

Nonfiction can be a catalyst and jumping off point for learning about new topics. Nonfiction can challenge students to be scientists by designing and preforming investigations and experiments. Finally, great nonfiction serves as a springboard to additional reading, research and learning.

Nonfiction books are a powerful tool. That is why the standards are encouraging them. With time being such a precious commodity, combining reading and science makes a lot of sense. Good teachers have always known this.

Respectfully, Dr. Susan Barker